Workplace Violence Experienced by Nursing Staff at a Tertiary Hospital in Urban Nepal

Main Article Content

Bimala Dhamala
Prithutam Bhattarai
Chandrakala Sharma
Shyam Thapa

Abstract

Background: Healthcare workplaces are prone to the occurrence of violence of varying types and degrees. This study assessed the prevalence of violence experienced by nursing staff at a tertiary hospital in urban Nepal.


Methods: A self-administered, cross-sectional survey was distributed to the entire nursing staff (N=146) currently working at a large teaching hospital in Kathmandu. The types of violence ascertained included verbal abuse, general harassment, physical assault, and sexual violence. Descriptive and logistic regression were applied to the data analysis.


Results: General harassment was the second most commonly experienced; 44% reported having experienced it any time in the past; and 28% reported to have experienced it in the last 12 months. Overall, 68% of all the respondents reported having experienced any type of violence, and 47% reported having experienced it any time in the last 12 months. Compared to single nurses/respondents, married nurses were particularly more likely to experience violence.


Conclusion: Development of workplace standards, orientation for all staff members, and the establishment of an effective monitoring and enforcement system are needed to minimize workplace violence at the study site, and most likely elsewhere in Nepal as well.

Article Details

Section
Original Research
How to Cite
Dhamala, B., Bhattarai, P., Sharma, C., & Thapa, S. (2021). Workplace Violence Experienced by Nursing Staff at a Tertiary Hospital in Urban Nepal. The Columbia University Journal of Global Health, 10(2). Retrieved from https://journals.library.columbia.edu/index.php/jgh/article/view/7084